The Scoop on Fermented Chicken Feed

     I always make sure that my chickens have plenty of food and water to get their day started before I get out to them.  They have their own little doorway to go out of in the morning since they get up earlier than mama….me!

     But one thing I like to do is give them a little something special before they go out to free range and especially in the winter months, after all what I make for them from inside is a little warmer and well lets face it…tastier too, at least I would think so.  I do like to do the fermented food method as I notice it does cut down on feed and costs somewhat and they absolutely love it.  If you’re not familiar  with this method, its basically chicken feed- either pellets or crumbles (I prefer pellets for our chickens since it’s less waste) and water,

covered lightly so as to allow for air as the fermentation process builds up a slight gas and expands. Allow to stand for about three days, stirring completely each day.  You’ll notice that a little bit of feed has now increased quite a bit. This process creates probiotics that assist in digestion and gut health.  **If you’re raising chickens for eggs, studies show that fermenting chicken feed to give to your chickens can increase egg weight and eggshell thickness, and boost the chickens’ intestinal health and immune system, increasing their resistance to diseases including Salmonella and E.coli.

     Seems to work pretty well since our girls are all healthy and happy and lay nice big eggs with hard shells!  I’ve also added sprout seeds and in a few days there’s nice greens for them.  Sometimes I give them just the feed, but most of the time I like to do some “mix-ins”.  All I know is they see me coming with the pan and go crazy for me to put it down and just attack it!! You can be sure I get some approving smiles…jus sayin’

To make fermented feed:

  • You can use a gallon container either plastic or glass with a lid or cove with cheesecloth. A 5 gallon pail works well too
  • Add 1/3 feed with 2/3 water, leaving enough room for expansion and stir really well
  • Cover with cheesecloth or lid, if lid be sure to leave open slightly
  • Let stand for at least 3 days stirring well each day, you’ll notice a little light bubbling and a sweet “yeasty” type smell due to the fermentation process.

Feed as much to chickens as they’ll consume in one day.  You’ll notice they’ll eat less of their dry food since it fills them up and provides the added nutrients.

Today I added some dried cranberries, flax seed, little sprinkling of oats and a some egg shells which I ground up.

I’d say everyone was delighted 😃 

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              Have an Outstanding Day

                                                                Cindy
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One Comment on “The Scoop on Fermented Chicken Feed

  1. Pingback: Snow and more Snow! – Sage Brush Homesteading

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